What caused a huge sinkhole in Tumon? - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

What caused a huge sinkhole in Tumon?

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The Department of Public Works is still trying to determine the cause of a sinkhole that developed in Tumon on Wednesday night.

If you didn't see it yourself in person, you may have seen the video circulating through a group chat - footage of a large sinkhole coming from Gun Beach on your way to the Westin Hotel.

DPW director Glenn Leon Guerrero told KUAM News, "We're seeing the surrounding soil looks compromised. So we want to make sure it's shored off before we take the steel plate off." Last night Guam Waterworks Authority Crews were also on sight to help DPW flush out the sinkhole.

As of last night, DPW crews went ahead and covered the hole with a steel plate. Leon Guerrero says the department will continue to investigate what may have caused the sinkhole. He said, "We're still doing the forensics of it, and the reason we're doing the forensics of it is obviously if it's happened we want to mitigate the cause of it and not just cover it with a band-aid."

According to information from the U.S. Geological Survey website. Sinkholes are common where the rock below the land surface can naturally be dissolved by groundwater circulating through them. As the rock dissolves, spaces and caverns develop underground.

Sinkholes are dramatic because the land usually stays intact for a while until the underground spaces just get too big. If there is not enough support for the land above the spaces then a sudden collapse of the land surface can occur.

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