McCreadie wants to hit sex offenders where it hurts most - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

McCreadie wants to hit sex offenders where it hurts most

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Throughout his legislative career, Senator Brant McCreadie has made it no secret he's going after criminals to keep Guam safe, and this morning he's introduced his most controversial legislation yet, this time going after sex offenders where it hurts most.

The gloves have come off, and the second-term policymaker is fighting crime like never before. "Chemical castration is a bill that's a ruthless and relentless attempt by my office to eliminate pedophiles and rapists," he said. Bill 99, otherwise known as The Chemical Castration for Sex Offenders Act, is in direct response to the alarming and growing number of rape cases." Commenting on Guam's sex offender statistics, McCreadie said, "We rank up there number one in the world per capita for those kinds of crimes."

The Republican lawmaker is behind tough crime laws such as the Predator Prevention Act, the island's Three Strikes Law, and the Vulnerable Victims Act. The intent of Bill 99 is to impose the treatment of chemical castration for convicted sex-offenders who are eligible for parole or post-prison supervision. In chemical castration, drugs are administered at customary intervals to reduce the levels of testosterone in the body, in doing so reducing sexual drive and resulting in infertility.

"To me, it's not controversial. It's a necessity," he said.

Chemical castration laws are in effect in California and Florida. Several other states such as Iowa, Lousiana, Georgia, Montana, Oregon, Texas and Wisconsin have experimented with chemical castration. He continued, "All that's left now is the vetting process moving through the Legislature and the public hearing and seeing what the public has to say. We have to do something, and obviously what we've been doing may not be working so this is an extreme measure."

Bill 99 is co-sponsored by Minority Leader Senator Tony Ada, who also is tough on crime. Senator Ada is the author of Guam's Castle Doctrine Law.

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