SDA physicians profile prevalent island diseases - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

SDA physicians profile prevalent island diseases

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 by Jolene Toves

Guam - Guam Seventh-Day Adventist doctors presented to Rotarians this afternoon regarding diseases prevalent in Guam and steps you can take to prevent them. Several illnesses are more prevalent in Guam than other parts of the world.

Seventh-Day Adventist doctors Tim Arawkawa and Anna Ursales detailed ways we can treat or even prevent these diseases through simple lifestyle changes. Dr. Ursales said about tuberculosis, "I found an article where the rates of TB here are actually six times higher than that of Hawaii and twelve times higher than that of the US mainland."

She says higher rates in Guam may be due to limited land space and closer contact between individuals, hence the importance for screening, not only for TB, but for sexually transmitted diseases as well as human immunodeficiency virus.

Dr. Arawkawa, on the other hand, is an endocrinology specialist, and says one major disease facing Guamanians is diabetes. SDA has many programs to help combat this issue, as he said, "We have some lifestyle programs that help people with diet, help them with exercise, give them the tools that they need in order to take better care of their diabetes. And in fact, if they start early enough, they can prevent diabetes from even occurring."

Lorraine Aguon was a participant in the last detox program, and said, "I lost nine pounds and then the following day I lost another pound. My clothes started to fit me and then I realized that my joints, my pains are gone."

Aguon had been suffering from weight gain and arthritis and because of her positive results, decided to continue following the program. To learn more about disease prevention, screening or wellness programs, you can contact the SDA Clinic at 646-8881. 
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