Occupy RMS: who's living in the Yona seminary? - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

Occupy RMS: who's living in the Yona seminary?

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Who's living at the Redemptoris Mater Seminary? That's what the Concerned Catholics of Guam want to find out. Despite efforts to get the facts from RMS leadership, the CCOG has received no response.

Today, they launched Occupy RMS - an effort to conduct a headcount of who's coming and going from the Yona property. Our cameras were posted today...here's what we saw.

It's the hottest asset on the Archdiocese of Agana's list of properties for sale to pay down nearly 100 clergy sex abuse lawsuits. We're talking about the former Yona hotel turned Redemptoris Mater Seminary. Owned by the Church, but currently occupied. By who?

That's the question - and why the Concerned Catholics of Guam have launched project Occupy RMS. CCOG's John Concepcion said, "We're just here taking a survey of cars entering and leaving. Just trying to find out who's actually staying in the facility."

In a letter addressed to RMS acting rector last month, the CCOG asks for the names of the tenants. CCOG's Greg Perez argues these individuals should pay up, adding, "This is church property and that's one of the big questions is who's here and why are they here and for those that are here, why aren't they paying rent like everyone else?"

CCOG's Gerry Taitano is also concerned about potential liabilities, noting, "Asked him who are staying here and what operations are being performed here. We're concerned that there may be some liabilities that are inadvertently being presented to the archdiocese - if they're running a hotel, because there's people, there should be licenses."

Also upsetting are recent fees posed on all Catholic school students to keep Church operations afloat. "Right now, the archdiocese is proposing that tuition rates for all the school children in the catholic schools be raised, and we're wondering why? Why raise those? Why don't you take a look at opportunity costs?" Taitano added.

KUAM News cameras tried to get answers today. The doors were locked and despite cars in the area, it was a ghost town. We did encounter this man... who wasn't too keen on our visit.

KUAM: can you say your name for us?

Man: No.

KUAM:  Do you live here?

Ma: Look here, you're news people and if you have a reason to be here, you would know who you want to talk with, right? And you would know the people's names. So you want to take everything and do what? To embarrass me and to embarrass everyone? And you're not polite.

KUAM: Huh?

Man: Why don't you come in politely and make a reservation as everyone does?

KUAM has made efforts to speak with RMS leadership but our phone calls were not returned. Occupy RMS will run for the next ten days.

Hopefully, to hold not just those living in the RMS accountable, but also the Church.

Taitao said, "Unfortunately, it takes the laity to do that. Because the church will never heal itself; it will never create a conflict for themselves. Clergy protects clergy - if there's anything we've learned from the [Archbishop Anthony] Apuron experience. And so we, the laity, have to take it upon ourselves to correct things. That's why we're here."

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