What happens when you're caught dumping illegally? - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

What happens when you're caught dumping illegally?

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 by Jolene Toves

Guam - There have been several cases of land owners who have had to face the consequences of illegal dumping occurring within their property.  "For those who own properties that they don't live on or maybe frequent regularly I would advise them to maybe periodically check the area to make sure there aren't any that no one is dumping on their property," said Guam EPA administrator Eric Palacios.

Palacios says when GEPA visits a property where suspected illegal dumping is occurring the landowner is responsible for whatever debris is found.  "We inform the landowner that they are in violation because the garbage is on their property and then once we do that then we try to work with them to identify who may have dumped on those properties," he said.

If there is no readily or personally identifiable information contained within the trash unfortunately the land owner will be stuck with the bill. And in some extreme cases the land can be seized...but losing your land should not be the only deterrent to illegal dumping the damage caused to the environment should be reason enough to dispose of garbage properly.  "There are a lot of adverse effects that illegal dumpsites create with any dump where there is a large volume of trash in a concentrated area leachate is generated it's the same type of leachate that is found in landfills," he explained.

This leachate can seep into our ground water or can be carried by storm water into our rivers and ocean. Palacios says dumping illegally can occur for many reason but none of those reasons are worth the long lasting negative effects it has on our environment. 
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