7 liberators return to Guam for parade - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

7 liberators return to Guam for parade

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 by Asha Robles

Guam - Guam received some very important visitors in the last few days. Seven liberators are currently on island for the island's 70th Liberation Day.

88-year-old liberator Tom Spry recalls a memory of his while fighting for Guam against the Japanese soldiers. "I was wounded in my leg, but it wasn't so bad I didn't have to be medivac'ed - couple of days in the local tent in Cetti Bay and I was back to my outfit. I still have the scar, but I wasn't liberated they sent me back," he said.

Liberator Gene Bell recalled how they drew out Japanese soldiers until the island was fully secured, telling KUAM News, "We set up a roadblock at the two intersections out of Agana that goes over to Talofofo and we continued the road block until after the island was secured and then we had daily patrols in the jungles driving out the Japanese and upon the last push of the island for the north most of it was over."

While these liberators have been on island, the Guam Visitors Bureau has taken them around to see how much the island changed and although most liberators have been back to Guam a couple of times in recent years, some haven't.

For 89-year-old Alfred Newman, this trip back to Guam was his first since the time they liberated the island. He said, "I'm glad in what I saw yesterday and today, how much improvement how much the people of Guam have advanced. Paved highways, nice big buildings office buildings whatever they are, it's just like any town in the united states and has prospered."

Newman was also one of the few Navajo codetalkers during the war and played a huge role in confusing the Japanese in understanding tactics discussed over the radio. "I used to watch them operate and I just sat there and watched them and I couldn't understand them, no one could understand them except the Navajo talkers that's why the Japanese could not interpret their messages, they formed their own language, made their own and the Japanese were lost," he recalled.

You can catch all seven liberators at this Monday's Liberation Parade. 
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