Blue House trial delayed as defendants waive right to speedy tri - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

Blue House trial delayed as defendants waive right to speedy trial

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by Mindy Aguon

GUAM - Police officers David Q. Manila and Anthony Quenga have waived their right to a speedy trial. It's the latest twist in the on-going Blue House Lounge saga. The two are accused of promoting prostitution at the former Blue House Lounge and they face criminal sexual conduct charges among others. The decision was made to allow the defense more time to adequately prepare for trial. Superior Court Judge Anita Sukola on Tuesday set the case for trial even though the Supreme Court determined that the two officers still had 14 days left on their speedy trial clock. With the trial set to begin this afternoon, defense attorneys informed the court that their clients decided to waive their right to a speedy trial, slowing the case down considerably. This means that jury selection is now set to begin on July 29th, giving defense attorneys more than a month to prepare. As we reported, Quenga's attorney Sylvia Stake has been on the case for only about two weeks and requested a delay in the trial due to the voluminous discovery. That request was denied during Tuesday's hearing but with the defendants' waiving their right, both Stake and Terry Timblin now have more time to prepare for trial.

The court set a pre-trial conference for nine o'clock in the morning on July 29th with jury selection to begin that same afternoon at one o'clock. In the meantime Manila's appeal over the lower court's denial of his bail modification is pending in the Guam Supreme Court. Timblin is set to file a reply brief on Thursday and justices are expected to decide the case without oral argument and rely solely on the briefs submitted by the parties.

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