Lujan/Quinata case now in jury's hands - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

Lujan/Quinata case now in jury's hands

Posted: Updated:

by Sabrina Salas Matanane

Guam - After more than three months of trial, a civil dispute between Umatac resident Debbie Quinata and Attorney David Lujan is finally in the hands of a jury.  Closing arguments and jury instructions were presented today. Jurors were asked to review the evidence presented in the case as well as recall the testimony of each of the witnesses. 

Lujan is suing Quinata alleging she and her husband blocked access to his property and encroached on his land without ever compensating him. Quinata filed a countersuit claiming emotional distress and medical problems as a direct result of Lujan's behavior.  Both are seeking monetary damages. 

Attorneys from both sides asked jurors to believe their client's testimony and review the evidence in the case. Deliberations will continue on Thursday. 

  • NEWS HEADLINESMore>>

  • Accused ATM skimmer didn't understand his rights, says defense

    Accused ATM skimmer didn't understand his rights, says defense

    Of all the Italian speakers on island, defense argues authorities used the wrong one. Public defender Rocky Kingree, in his filing earlier this week, resubmits his argument that his client, Nicola Marinelli, did not fully understand his rights when he repMore >>
    Of all the Italian speakers on island, defense argues authorities used the wrong one. Public defender Rocky Kingree, in his filing earlier this week, resubmits his argument that his client, Nicola Marinelli, did not fully understand his rights when he repMore >>
  • $2M in compact impact funding coming Guam's way

    $2M in compact impact funding coming Guam's way

    Guam will get another $2 million in compact impact funding. In a news release, the U.S. Interior department said the money can be used to help defray the educational impacts of migrants from the freely associated states. Guam and Hawaii were the most heavMore >>
    Guam will get another $2 million in compact impact funding. In a news release, the U.S. Interior department said the money can be used to help defray the educational impacts of migrants from the freely associated states. Guam and Hawaii were the most heavMore >>
  • One step closer to tuition-free trade school education

    One step closer to tuition-free trade school education

    The island is a step closer to tuition-free trade schools and colleges. The administration announced the awarding of a $1 million Department of Interior grant to fund education and training for 193 students on Guam who graduated in 2017 and 2018. The moneMore >>
    The island is a step closer to tuition-free trade schools and colleges. The administration announced the awarding of a $1 million Department of Interior grant to fund education and training for 193 students on Guam who graduated in 2017 and 2018. The moneMore >>
Powered by Frankly