GMH faces painkiller shortage - KUAM.com-KUAM News: On Air. Online. On Demand.

GMH faces painkiller shortage

Posted: Updated:

by Janjeera Hail

Guam - The Guam Memorial Hospital has been using morphine and Dialudid, while they wait for a new shipment of the commonly used painkiller Demerol. GMH supplier Hospira had refused to send out a new shipment of the drug because of the agency's outstanding balance of nearly $80,000.

According to GMH spokesperson Connor Murphy, the hospital paid that debt off in full on Friday.  However, the strict regulations surrounding Demerol mean the hospital can't refill its stock right away. "They are so tightly controlled by the DEA, so we can't really keep a backup inventory," he explained. "At any one time we only have what's there at our pharmacy and even then it has to be locked up. And any time we make an order to our suppliers we have to send a hard copy of a certain DEA form before they can release it to us."

Meanwhile, the hospital's total account receivables are currently more than $14 million.

  • NEWS HEADLINESMore>>

  • Accused ATM skimmer didn't understand his rights, says defense

    Accused ATM skimmer didn't understand his rights, says defense

    Of all the Italian speakers on island, defense argues authorities used the wrong one. Public defender Rocky Kingree, in his filing earlier this week, resubmits his argument that his client, Nicola Marinelli, did not fully understand his rights when he repMore >>
    Of all the Italian speakers on island, defense argues authorities used the wrong one. Public defender Rocky Kingree, in his filing earlier this week, resubmits his argument that his client, Nicola Marinelli, did not fully understand his rights when he repMore >>
  • $2M in compact impact funding coming Guam's way

    $2M in compact impact funding coming Guam's way

    Guam will get another $2 million in compact impact funding. In a news release, the U.S. Interior department said the money can be used to help defray the educational impacts of migrants from the freely associated states. Guam and Hawaii were the most heavMore >>
    Guam will get another $2 million in compact impact funding. In a news release, the U.S. Interior department said the money can be used to help defray the educational impacts of migrants from the freely associated states. Guam and Hawaii were the most heavMore >>
  • One step closer to tuition-free trade school education

    One step closer to tuition-free trade school education

    The island is a step closer to tuition-free trade schools and colleges. The administration announced the awarding of a $1 million Department of Interior grant to fund education and training for 193 students on Guam who graduated in 2017 and 2018. The moneMore >>
    The island is a step closer to tuition-free trade schools and colleges. The administration announced the awarding of a $1 million Department of Interior grant to fund education and training for 193 students on Guam who graduated in 2017 and 2018. The moneMore >>
Powered by Frankly